Souks (Markets) of Marrakech, Morocco

Marrakech is home to some of the best, most authentic shopping options in the Magreb. The city's souks have starred in travel literature, films and armchair travelers' daydreams for decades. There is no one central market area but a series of interconnected markets.

 Image credit: www.bbc.com

Image credit: www.bbc.com

Historically, all souks were divided and laid out according to separate commodities being made and sold, with the most valuable products (gold, manuscripts) positioned in the centre of the main souk area and lesser expensive goods radiating out from there. Today, little has changed. Each souk is still named after the product being sold and, aside from allowances for modern tastes, the goods are much as they would have been a thousand years ago.

The souks start from the north at Jemaa el Fna and continue in a maze until they hit the Musée de Marrakech. They are open from 09:00 am to 09:00 pm, the best time to visit the market being the mornings when the temperature is a little cool.


Semmarine Souk

 www.travellingsoulmates.com

www.travellingsoulmates.com

Known as the textile market and the main artery of the souks, it is a broad, covered alley that sells everything from good quality fabric to huge, tourist emporiums. The souk begins with pottery and pâtisserie and moves into good quality fabric and textiles shops, selling everything from kaftans to pashminas, and huge, expensive, tourist emporiums full of antiques, carpets and jewellery.


Souk Smata

 Image Credit: Wikipedia.com

Image Credit: Wikipedia.com

Known as the shoe souk, filled with pointed, brightly-coloured and sequined leather babouches (Moroccan slippers) loved by the Moroccans.


Souk el Attarine

 Image credit: thewanderers.com

Image credit: thewanderers.com

Taking the left fork off Souk Semmarine brings you onto Souk el Attarin -- the spice and perfume souk. The street is bright and gleaming with copper and brass lanterns, mirrors, candlesticks, silver teapots and lamps, as well as spices and perfumes (for which it was traditionally known).


Souk des Bijoutiers

A small lane full of Jewelry- Look for an overhead sign for the Souk des Bijoutiers (also labeled Souk Tagmoutyime)


Souk Chouari & Souk Haddadine

The working carpenters’ and blacksmiths’ souks. Located to the west of Smata Souk, Souk Chouari is filled with an aroma of Cedar wood. Beyond that is a noisy black smith’s market known as Souk Haddadine.


Souk Zrabia

 Image credit: www.londonoa.com

Image credit: www.londonoa.com

Originally the slave market, now a smaller covered square filled with Carpets. There are auctions held at 5 pm daily (except Friday) which is a marvelous site to witness.


Other than these there are a lot more souks that sell daily wear clothing, souvenirs, cosmetics, herbal lotions. You also have a street filled with colourful dyer’s where wool and fabric are dyed and left hanging across the alleyways to dry, known as Souk des Teinturiers.